Acclaim

What the press had to say about Opera Omnia’s The Coronation of Poppea and Giasone

“Virtually every aspect of this production leaves an audience desiring more from this young company whose ambition to specialize in seventeenth century opera will fill a vital gap in the city’s musical culture.”
Classics Today

“a serious entry into the ranks of small-bore companies in New York”
The New York Times

“…there was a lot to be said for its directness: in so small a theater, with a light accompaniment and consistently clear singing, you could take in the drama directly, without having to translate or read titles.”
The New York Times

“Vocally, the company’s firepower was in the two main mezzo-soprano roles….Hai-Ting Chinn [gave her] vocal lines a seductively velvety tone…Cherry Duke sang the music of this top-drawer historical creep with a regal bearing.”
The New York Times

“Crystal Manich’s lively staging meshes pathos and bathos with quirky touches alluding to Poisson Rouge’s Greenwich Village neighborhood, and illuminates the link between Cavalli’s satire and the commedia dell’arte tradition.”
The New York Times

“The opera abounds with gorgeous melodies and beautiful instrumental music, performed impeccably by a small period ensemble including the violinist Robert Mealy and led by Avi Stein on harpsichord.”
The New York Times

If opera were baseball, little, gutsy Opera Omnia, under the directorship of Wesley Chinn, would be batting a thousand.
Classics Today

“One of Manhattan’s finest mini-companies”–The New York Post

“more gripping than one could ever imagine…this production was so compulsive that one could only feel awe, both for the young performers and the ageless composer.”
Concertonet.com

“Opera Omnia has definitely targeted an underserved and neglected niche in the city’s musical landscape.”
–Gay City News

“The band, a crack seven-member ensemble of period-instrument players played eloquently….Text is central to 17th-century opera…and with the audience almost on top of the singers there were no barriers to comprehension….The audience of about 220 seemed riveted.”
The Wall Street Journal

“The company offers a refreshingly all-American mix of careful scholarship in musical realization and a vibrantly contemporary aesthetic for presenting early opera for a modern audience….The cast had no problem in communicating virtually every heart beat of Monteverdi’s work within the relaxed cabaret setting…bringing us far closer to the irreverent environment of the Venetian opera house of the 1640s than would be possible in any tradition-encrusted opera house, either in the US or Europe.”
Classics Today